Biden Breaks Fundraising Record Again, Buoyed by Debate

Eufemia Didonato

(Bloomberg) — Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s campaign set another fundraising record in September, surpassing the unprecedented $364.5 million it raised in August, according to three people familiar with the matter. © Photographer: Alex Wong/Getty Images JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA – SEPTEMBER 30: Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Joe Biden gestures during a […]

(Bloomberg) — Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s campaign set another fundraising record in September, surpassing the unprecedented $364.5 million it raised in August, according to three people familiar with the matter.



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA - SEPTEMBER 30: Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Joe Biden gestures during a campaign stop outside Johnstown Train Station September 30, 2020 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Former Vice President Biden continues to campaign for the upcoming presidential election today on a day-long train tour with stops in Ohio and Pennsylvania. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)


© Photographer: Alex Wong/Getty Images
JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA – SEPTEMBER 30: Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Joe Biden gestures during a campaign stop outside Johnstown Train Station September 30, 2020 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Former Vice President Biden continues to campaign for the upcoming presidential election today on a day-long train tour with stops in Ohio and Pennsylvania. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

An exact number was not yet available, but the people said the campaign and the Democratic National Committee brought in more money in September than August, which was the biggest campaign fundraising month in the history of modern presidential politics.

Democrats across the board saw a cash windfall last month after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as President Donald Trump moved to fill her seat on the Supreme Court before the Nov. 3 election.

Some of the money came in late. Biden raised $31.5 million in just over 24 hours after Tuesday night’s raucous presidential debate in Cleveland, according to Rob Flaherty, the campaign’s digital director, with $10 million of that amount coming between 9 p.m. and midnight.

The money was raised by the Biden campaign, the Democratic National Committee, and two joint fundraising committees that collect funds for both entities. Biden’s campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the monthly total.

Earlier: Trump Campaign Slashes Ad Spending in Key States in Cash Crunch

After August’s historic month, Biden said: “That figure blows me away.”

In August, Trump and the Republican National Committee raised $210 million, falling $154 million short of Biden. The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to an emailed request for information on its fundraising numbers.

Biden started September with a $466 million mountain of cash to take on Trump and the Republicans, completely reversing the GOP’s financial advantage in just four months.

In April, Biden had about $98 million in the bank compared to $255 million for the incumbent. Yet Democratic donor enthusiasm, driven by opposition to Trump and further energized by the selection of Senator Kamala Harris of California as Biden’s running mate, has given the former vice president an unprecedented financial edge for a challenger.

Trump’s re-election effort had $325 million at the end of August, or $141 million less than Biden’s. His campaign cut some advertising spending and went completely dark in key states in September. Biden widely outspent Trump on media, booking $172.4 million on television, radio and digital ads in September compared to $69.8 million for Trump, according to Advertising Analytics.

Biden currently has reserved $115.5 million of broadcast and cable advertising time in October compared to $89.8 million for Trump.

(Updates with no response from Trump campaign, in seventh paragraph.)

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